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I’ve thought a bit before choosing the category for this article. It was between #CareerCounseling and #GettingPersonal. I chose the latter.

My grandparents, and many other people who started working in the 60`s, 70`s, have told me how easy it was to get a job. There were lots of jobs and very few people to occupy them. It was enough to go into a factory/store (or anywhere else), ask for a job and get it.

In the past few years, I applied to quite a few jobs and I`ve read lots of job descriptions.

What surprises me all the time is that employers ask for stuff that are completely unreal. 

'He has an MBA from Wharton.'

For example, for an Assistant Professor job, they ask for a PhD + minimum 3 years of post-PhD experience, three languages at least, work experience in developed AND developing countries etc. If a candidate would have all these (not me), would he really apply for a job that pays maximum 2,000 Euros/month and means carrying a bag for a professor while teaching?

Another example: entry-level specialist in agricultural policies. They ask for minimum a Master degree in the field (PhD is an advantage), between 5 and 8 years of experience working for similar organizations and three languages (among others). Again, would a candidate really take an entry-level position?

The conclusion is that there are too many specialists and very few jobs.

Employers ask for things that a candidate (for that position) cannot have, just to get a senior expert to do an entry-level job.

Not nice. Not nice at all.

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