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You are always making decisions and communicating them externally. Some decisions are wrong, some are right.

When you are wrong about a decision you made, the right thing to do is to redefine the factors that you took into account during the decision making process and try to come up with a new conclusion.

When you are right, and if this decision is supported by all the factors you took into account, the correct way to move forward with it is to communicate it to third parties and to implement it.

But about when your “right” decision is considered wrong by others? Most people face employers, colleagues, business angels (when searching for funding), professors that might try to convince them that their decision/conclusion is wrong and their decision making process was faulted. Coming from a “power factor“, the majority of people might consider that “they are wrong” and scrap their decision without even thinking twice about it. Others might consider the consequences of being the “right kind of wrong” before reconsidering their decision and try to find an alternative way of communicating their initial decision. And there is a small group of rebels that stand behind their decision “no matter what“.

Being right is wrong” when other people`s interests/beliefs come into conflict with yours.

Very few people today consider “the human factor” when taking a decision. Even less consider “the big picture” involving communities, organizations and individuals alike. Being the “right kind of wrong” involves not merely taking a decision that can be corrected if required, but also being able to defend in front of all those “bullies” no matter what their rank is.

I have been confronted in my life with numerous situations when my decisions and decision making were questioned by different “power factors” and have come to the conclusion that I am a person with the “right kind of wrong” not overly defending my decision, but also not giving it up without a fight if I know it to be right.

What kind of person are you?

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