Dealing with epilepsy

[Guest post #4] Infertility and in-vitro

This blog post comes from Switzerland, written by Martine. I love the diversity of people reading my blog and of those wanting to write. One more guest blog post available. Enjoy!

I am Swiss national, but I am born in France and have lived for many, many years in various countries around the world (work reasons). After getting married 11 years ago, my husband and I tried to have a baby. Many attempts later (3 years later) and a (more permanent) move to France, we decided to get tested for fertility.  Continue reading “[Guest post #4] Infertility and in-vitro”

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Dealing with epilepsy

[Guest post #3]: I am a drug trafficker

The third guest post comes directly from Germany from Janis. Enjoy!

I was travelling from Bruxelles to New York for a short vacation in the US. As Germany is part of the Visa Waiver Program, I only applied for an ESTA online, without seeking additional info from the embassy.

That was my mistake, I admit it. I only checked a few website, the FDA’s in particular. I followed all instructions: getting a letter in English from the doctor etc.

Arriving in New York was “interesting”: after waiting for the bags, I was “kindly” asked by the Border patrol to come to their office for extra inquiries. This is when I started freaking out. Arriving there, I was submitted to a 2-hours long discussion regarding my meds. Read more for some really interesting stuff!

Dealing with epilepsy

[Guest post #2] Education is not for people with epilepsy

The second guest blog post comes directly from India from Advik.

I grew up in the UK as my parents immigrated there back in the ’60s. All throughout my adolescence, I was discriminated against at school, in the playground, in my neighborhood because I was Indian. After a while, I gotten used to it and simply ignored it.

Then my #epilepsy came in. In my second year of secondary school (high school) , I had my first seizure. And it was at school. Professors and colleagues panicked, an ambulance was called, parents came rushing and, you know already, more.

I woke up in the hospital with an IV and a few meds.

Over the year, I had several other seizures at home, at school, in the supermarket and so on. In total: 28 seizures that year. At school, people started making fun of me, imitating my seizures in a cry for attention. And the year went on like that. Continue reading “[Guest post #2] Education is not for people with epilepsy”